Gripping new film “Wackersdorf” on successful German protest of nuke reprocessing plant; screens April 11, Washington DC (VIDEO)

April 11, 2019, 6:30 pm
Goethe-Institut
Washington DC

From by Beyond Nuclear

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Click on cc to get English subtitles.

In a season when we remember the nuclear disasters at Fukushima, Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, we can also celebrate a hard-won anti-nuclear victory. Beyond Nuclear is honored to be co-hosting a screening of a new feature film, Wackersdorf, the true story of a politician in Southern Germany who at first welcomed the prospect of a nuclear reprocessing plant in his community, then changed his mind and helped lead the protests which contributed to its cancelation.

The screening will take place at the Goethe-Institut in Washington, DC on April 11 at 6:30pm. The film, a drama in German with English subtitles, will be followed by a discussion with the film’s director, Oliver Haffner, moderated by Paul Gunter of Beyond Nuclear. The event is free and open to the public. Register here.

Watch the trailer (click on CC at right to choose English subtitles.)

And please contact Beyond Nuclear if you are interested in screening the film.

http://www.BeyondNuclear.org

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‘Crash of the Pacific sardines’: 98.5% collapse since 2006. NMFS may cancel Monterey Bay 2019 and 2020 seasons.

The numbers are startling.

2017  86,586 metric tons
2018  52,065 metric tons
2019  27,547 metric tons, “a 98.5 percent collapse since 2006.”

“The collapse is a result of overfishing, [Geoff] Shester said. Sardine populations go through natural cyclical fluctuations, but to see numbers this low is caused from over-fishing.

That isn’t credible.

Fukushima hit in 2011 when the sardines were in a severe down-swing (see chart below). Radioactivity contaminated the kelp and the ocean initially. The Monterey Bay kelp had measureable levels. The contamination increases by air and ocean releases to this day, and none of it is “biodegradeable”.

Historic over-fishing is only one factor. Fukushima radioactive contamination is never mentioned by the media or the scientists.

The ocean environment is crashing. The sardines are canaries. They’ve had no chance at recovery. And the brown pelicans and sea lions are just two species that are dying of starvation as a result.

sardines and kelp
Photo, courtesy of NOAA

From the  Monterey Herald


Sardine fishery likely will be closed this season

Dennis Taylor

3-28-19

MONTEREY — Sardine fishermen in Monterey Bay are facing a fifth straight year of restrictions on the amount they will be permitted to catch, creating financial hardships for the commercial industry.

A new draft assessment from the National Marine Fisheries Service indicates a sardine population of 27,547 metric tons. According to the Fisheries Service, any tonnage below 50,000 metric tons is considered “overfished.” That’s a 98.5 percent collapse since 2006.

The restriction, which would essentially cancel the 2019-2020 commercial sardine season, must be applied when populations drop under 150,000 metric tons, said Geoff Shester, senior scientist with the Monterey office of Oceana, a marine environmental watchdog group.

The crash of Pacific sardines has been difficult to watch,” Shester said. “We’ve witnessed dramatic starvation effects to ocean animals.”

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— Eight Years Ago: The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster in Perspective

From Global Research

By Dr. Helen CaldicottGlobal Research, March 04, 2019 Originally posted 12 May 2011

Dr. Helen Caldicott’s March 18th, 2011 press conference in Montreal, sponsored by the Centre for Research on Globalization (CRG)


Our thanks to Felton Davis for the transcription from the GRTV Video recording and for the annotations.

“One of the most deadly [nuclear byproducts] is plutonium, named after Pluto, god of the underworld. One millionth of a gram, if you inhale it, would give you cancer. Hypothetically, one pound of plutonium if evenly distributed could give everyone on earth cancer. Each reactor has 250 kilograms of plutonium in it. You only need 2.5 kilograms to make an atomic bomb, because plutonium is what they make bombs with. (Helen Caldicott, March 18, 2011)

This press conference organized by Global Research was held in the context of Helen Caldicott’s public lecture to Montreal on March 18, 2011.

Transcript:

First I want to present this report, produced by the New York Academy of Sciences, a report on Chernobyl.  It can be downloaded.(2)  They translated 5,000 articles from Russian for the first time into English.  It seems that nearly a million people have already died as a result of Chernobyl, despite what the WH0(3) says and the IAEA.(4)  This is one of the most monstrous cover-ups in the history of medicine.  Because everybody should know about this.

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