Take Action Now! Information and Fukushima Flyers

To become informed on the history of the Fukushima disaster and spreading radiation, go to the archives of  —

http://www.enenews.com

See this timeline of wildlife and ocean impacts through 2015

https://healfukushimadotorg.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/fukushima-pacific-ocean-chronology-ene-docs.pdf

Flyers
These flyers from Fukushima Response can be printed on colored paper (like pale yellow) for greater visibility. Distribute everywhere.

Fukushima Response flyer, p.1
Fukushima Response flyer, p.2

This is a spreading emergency amid a news media blackout. Many actions are needed to warn the public and solve the growing radiation which is harming everything worldwide

Get informed!

Get the word out!

Take action!

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— Trinity downwinders: Dancing in the dust of death

Deliberate government atrocities —

“From the very beginning, the federal government has refused to take responsibility,”  — Sen. Tom Udall

‘A few people were probably overexposed, but they couldn’t prove it and we couldn’t prove it so we just assumed we got away with it.’” — Manhattan Project Medical Director, Dr. Louis Hempelmann

From Beyond Nuclear International

July 16 2018

Time to recognize New Mexico’s Trinity downwinders

By Linda Pentz Gunter

When Barbara Kent was twelve years old she went away to dance camp. It was July 1945. A dozen young girls were enjoying a summer retreat, sleeping together in a cabin, and sharing their love of dance. On July 16 they danced with something deadly.

After being jolted unexpectedly out of bed, they went outside pre-dawn when it should have been dark, to find it bright as day with a strange white ash falling like snowflakes. “Winter in July,” Kent, now 86 years old, has called it.

The girls rubbed the “snowflakes” on their bodies and caught them with their tongues. Before they all turned 40, 10 of the 12 girls had died.

No one had warned the girls, or their teacher, or anyone in the community, that the US government had just exploded the first atomic bomb a little more than 50 miles away at the Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range in New Mexico, now known as the Trinity Test Site. The “snowflakes” were deadly radioactive fallout and just the beginning of an endless — and likely permanent — cycle of disease, death and deprivation.

“While it was not the end of the world, it was the beginning of the end for so many people,” said Tina Cordova, co-founder of the Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium, an organization that “seeks justice for the unknowing, unwilling and uncompensated participants of the July 16, 1945 Trinity test in southern New Mexico.”

Uncompensated because, even though the Trinity atomic bomb was detonated in New Mexico, and for no reason that anyone has yet ascertained, the people of New Mexico dosed by the fallout have never been acknowledged or officially recognized by the federal government as downwinders.

They have never been compensated and, certainly, they have never received an apology from the US government.

That is why, for the past eight years, first as a US congressman and now as a member of the US Senate, Tom Udall (D-NM) has been fighting for the Trinity downwinders in his state to be included in the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act that, since the law’s inception in 1990, and even after it was amended in 2000, has failed, among others, to include New Mexico victims of the Trinity test.

On June 26, 2018, a hearing finally took place before the US Senate Judiciary Committee, at which Udall and many victims of exposure to radioactive fallout and uranium mining — on the Navajo Nation, in Idaho, New Mexico and even Guam — testified. All of them asked that RECA be amended once again to include those forgotten, ignored and affected, even though in many ways it is coming seventy three years too late.

“People sometimes ask me, ‘why don’t you just move?’” said Cordova when we talked after the Hill hearing. “Well the only safe day to move was July 15, 1945.”

Continue reading

— San Francisco: Eco-fraud by the bay

From Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER)
Summer 2018 newsletter

Hot Property…in More Ways than One.
Hunters Point is being touted as San Francisco’s biggest
redevelopment since the 1906 earthquake.

San Francisco currently has a severe case of real estate fever,
pricing all but the rich out of its new housing market. The city’s poorest quarter, Bayview-Hunters Point in its southeast corner, is the latest epicenter of development mania. But, there is a big problem.

The Hunters Point Naval Shipyard hosted nuclear weapons work, including supposed decontamination of Navy ships used in Pacific hydrogen bomb tests–which left the shipyard with ultra-high radioactivity. It has been an EPA Superfund site since 1989.

Now, this nearly 30-year radiation cleanup has run off the tracks. PEER has obtained documents showing that the remaining contamination is far, far worse than previously reported:
• Almost 100% of the soil samples taken by the U.S. Navy’s contractor Tetra Tech re-examined by the  EPA are “falsified,” subject to deliberate manipulation and “neither reliable nor defensible”;
• Parcels transferred to San Francisco under false pretenses as suitable remain deeply contaminated; and
• Most every Tetra Tech radiation survey on the shipyard’s buildings is bogus.

One of the things that makes these findings so remarkable is that the Navy was on notice for years that it had a major data meltdown on its hands yet is still trying to cook the books. Of course, neither the Navy nor EPA revealed any of this. There are still more shoes to drop and we intend to make Hunters Point the poster child for meaningful Superfund reform.

– – – – – – – –

Don’t Eat the Tomatoes
In areas of Hunters Point certified as clean, residents are subject to
a curious covenant: they may not grow food unless they import
soil. This raises the question of what is meant by “clean.” It is especially important with respect to radiation, a pollutant that keeps
on giving.

https://www.peer.org/assets/docs/PEEReview_Summer_18.pdf

Posted under Fair Use Rules

— July 16, 1979: Church Rock, New Mexico uranium disaster is largely unknown

From Beyond Nuclear Internatiional
July 16, 2018

A 90 million gallon nuclear tragedy

The uranium tailings spill at Church Rock, NM was the largest single release of radioactive contamination in US history

By Linda Pentz Gunter

On July 16, 1979,  the worst accidental release of radioactive waste in U.S. history happened at the Church Rock uranium mine and mill site. While the Three Mile Island accident (that same year) is well known, the enormous radioactive spill in New Mexico has been kept quiet. It is the U.S. nuclear accident that almost no one knows about.

Just 14 weeks after the Three Mile Island reactor accident, and 34 years to the day after the Trinity atomic test, the small community of Church Rock, New Mexico became the scene of another nuclear tragedy.

Ninety million gallons of liquid radioactive waste, and eleven hundred tons of solid mill wastes, burst through a broken dam wall at the Church Rock uranium mill facility, creating a flood of deadly effluents that permanently contaminated the Puerco River.

No one knows exactly how much radioactivity was released into the air during the Three Mile Island accident. The site monitors were shut down after their measurements of radioactive releases went off the scale.

But the American public knows even less about the Church Rock spill and, five weeks after it occurred, the mine and mill operator, United Nuclear Corporation (UNC), was back in business as if nothing had happened. Today, the Church Rock accident is acknowledged as likely the largest single release of radioactive contamination ever to take place in U.S. history (outside of the atomic bomb tests).

Why is the Church Rock spill – that washed into gullies, contaminated fields and the animals that grazed there, and made drinking water deadly – so anonymous in the annals of our nuclear history? Perhaps the answer lies in where it took place and who it affected.

Church Rock was a small farming community of Native Americans, mainly Navajo, eking out a subsistence living off the arid Southwestern land. Nearby, several hundred million gallons of liquid uranium mill tailings were sitting in a pond waiting for evaporation to leave behind solid tailings for storage. On the morning of July 16, 1979, part of the dam wall collapsed, releasing a roaring flood of radioactive water and sludge.

Continue reading

— Ojai, California’s nuclear-free resolution: A call to action

From Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR)

May 24, 2018
By Bob Dodge, MD

On April 10, 2018, the city of Ojai, California adopted a resolution declaring the city the first nuclear-free zone in decades. Against the backdrop of events over the past year, and recognizing the catastrophic human consequences of any use of nuclear weapons plus the exorbitant costs of nuclear weapons production and maintenance, the City Council adopted the resolution unanimously.

The background for our Resolution began last November when I approached one of our city council members about the proposal. He was supportive and encouraging of the process. On November 18th, during public comments, I challenged the City Council to take a stand on behalf of the citizens of Ojai regarding the greatest public health threat we face, that of nuclear war, and declare our city a nuclear-free zone. I encouraged them to consider a future response when our children’s children ask us: “What did you do when the planet was threatened?” We will be able to say we took a stand for the abolition of nuclear weapons. The Council that night agreed to put the Resolution on a future agenda.

One week later, the California Thomas fire started with Ojai at the epicenter. I requested our efforts be postponed until the city could return to some semblance of normalcy. On February 13, the Council Resolution was introduced by Councilmembers Francina and Weirick. Speaking on behalf of the Resolution, I advised the Council that as city leaders and first responders—just as in our recent fire—they had a responsibility to protect the citizens of Ojai. I stated—as a physician—that  there was no adequate response to a nuclear attack and that prevention by abolition of these weapons was the only response. After discussion, the Council unanimously voted to consider the Resolution.

At their April 10th meeting, the Council announced that the Resolution was adopted unanimously!

This bold Resolution has three main components.

First, it adopts the five point “Back From The Brink” resolution that many PSR chapters are championing.  “The city council, on behalf of the residents of Ojai, call on the United States and our elected officials to lead a global effort to prevent nuclear war” via:

  • Renounce the option of using nuclear weapons first.
  • End the president’s sole, unchecked authority to launch a nuclear attack.
  • Take U.S. nuclear weapons off hair-trigger alert.
  • Cancel the plan to replace the entire U.S. arsenal with enhanced weapons.
  • Actively pursue a verifiable agreement among nuclear armed states to eliminate their nuclear arsenals.

Secondly, the City Council declares Ojai a Nuclear Weapons Free Zone by prohibiting a variety of nuclear weapons-related activities within the city.

The third section, titled “Nuclear Free Contracts and Investments,” includes guidelines for city contracting and investment of funds.  The resolution calls for divestment from institutions and companies that are involved in the financing, manufacture, development, stockpiling and testing of nuclear weapons.

Recognizing that Ojai is but one small Southern California community, the resolution concludes with this appeal to other communities:

“Conscious of the magnitude of destructive capacity of modern nuclear weapons, we recognize that our proposal would have little meaning on its own. We therefore appeal to our neighboring counties and cities to make similar statements on the half of the citizens they represent”.

This appeal has already had an effect on neighboring communities. A group of middle school students from R.J. Frank Academy of Marine Science and Engineering, aware of the Ojai action, just challenged the city of Oxnard to protect their future and adopt a similar resolution. California State Assembly member Monique Limón has introduced California Joint Resolution 33 calling on the state to adopt the “Back From the Brink” resolution. Ultimately, we all have an opportunity and role to play in bringing forth a future free of nuclear weapons.

Text of the Ojai resolution

Text of California Joint Resolution 33, introduced by Assembly member Monique Limón

Nuclear weapons divestment information from “Don’t Bank on the Bomb”

“Back from the Brink” resolution and background

https://www.psr.org/blog/2018/05/24/ojai-californias-nuclear-free-resolution-a-call-to-action/

— Canada’s First Nations and nuclear waste — UN special event April 23, 2018 (revised location)

From Planetary Association for Clean Energy 

  • Radioactivity causes cancer and damages unborn children
  • Radioactive wastes remain dangerous for thousands of years
  • Radioactive poisons contaminate air, soil, food and water
  • Radioactive wastes are trucked through indigenous territories
  • Radioactive wastes are dumped on or near indigenous lands
  • Indigenous people have not given free prior informed consent
  • Indigenous communities have not been adequately consulted

Revised event flyer PDF

On the occasion of the 17th Session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, meeting from April 16 to 27 in NYC, the Anishinabek Nation and the Iroquois Caucus are hosting a special event to address “Canada’s First Nations & Radioactive Waste”.
April 23, 1:15 to 2:30 pm.

Conference Room 4 (CR4)
UN Headquarters Building
(The scheduled room was changed to allow for webcasting.)
New York City

and will be webcast live on the United Nations web site. 


In attendance will be Grand Chief Patrick Madahbee of the Anishinabek Nation, Chiefs Clinton Phillips and William Diabo of the Mohawk Council of Kahnawake, and Chiefs Troy Wilson and April Adams-Phillips of the Mohawk Council of Akwasasne.

Dr. Gordon Edwards of the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibilityand Dr. Ole Hendrickson on the Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area will also be in attendance as resource persons and technical advisors.

— Petition: Help Kyoto fight the dangerous Ohi plant restart.

From Green Action, Japan

Sign the petition here.

Kyoto, the ancient capital of Japan, is cherished worldwide for its countless World Heritage sites and cultural treasures. Kyoto also shares a northern border with Fukui prefecture, the location of the highest concentration of nuclear power plants in the world. This is particularly alarming since the Japanese archipelago is riddled with earthquake faults and volcanoes.

Citizens from nations around the world can support Kyoto’s Governor and Mayor’s efforts to protect Kyoto. Let us stand with them to prevent another Fukushima disaster!

We are deeply concerned that the Japanese national government wants everything “back to normal” by the 2020 Olympics: Fukushima accident evacuees back to the Fukushima region, nuclear power plants restarted–everything back to pre-Fukushima days.

After the Fukushima accident, the world saw unprecedented citizen protest against the restart of nuclear power in Japan. Particularly prominent was the protest against the Ohi nuclear power plant in Fukui. The Ohi plant is less than 60 kilometers (37 miles) from the city center of Kyoto. It is deeply concerning that the plant is slated to restart in March 2018. An Ohi restart will threaten millions of Kyoto residents and Lake Biwa, the largest lake in Japan from which 14 million people receive their drinking water. A serious accident could have devastating effects on Kyoto’s world-famous cultural treasures and World Heritage sites.

The Governor and Mayor of Kyoto have petitioned the national government for the right to say yes/no to restart, to have control over Kyoto’s fate. Their plea has been answered with silence. The Japanese government must respond promptly and positively to assure Kyoto has the right to protect itself. This petition will enable the governor and mayor to show they have worldwide support.

Help Kyoto fight Ohi restart! 
Please see English language video:
https://youtu.be/di1BqYaOl8I

Sign the petition here.

From Nuclear Information and Resource Service
http://www.nirs.org
February 23, 2018

Our friends at Green Action in Japan need our help! The governor of Japan’s Fukui Province approved the restart of two reactors at the Ohi nuclear plant near Kyoto, only a few hundred miles from the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

This took place in the face of much public opposition, and we are supporting the activists of Kyoto as they fight to keep the reactors off line.

On February 16th, Kyoto citizens and others from the surrounding region went to Kyoto City to urge legislators to oppose Ohi nuclear power plant restart.

Sign their petition–international signatures really help!

And please spread the word!

Thanks for all you do!

Tim Judson
Executive Director

 

— ‘Global consequences’ of lethal radiation leak at Fukushima; TEPCO botches recent measurement inside reactor; “insane” levels detected last year, exceed Chernobyl

From Sputnik News

February 4, 2018

Lethal levels of radiation have been observed inside Japan’s damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant. And they are arguably way higher than you suspect.

According to Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco), radiation levels of eight Sieverts per hour (Sv/h) have been discovered within the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was destroyed after a massive earthquake and a tsunami in March 2011.

Japanese Regulator Advocates Releasing Toxic Water Into Sea at Fukushima

Tepco, the company that operated the plant and is now tasked with decommissioning it, reported the discovery after making observations in a reactor containment vessel last month.

Eight Sv/h of radiation, if absorbed at once, mean certain death, even with quick treatment. One Sv/h is likely to cause sickness and 5.5 Sv/h will result in a high chance of developing cancer.

While 8 Sv/h is deadly, outside of Fukushima’s Reactor Number 2 foundations of a much higher level of 42 Sv/h was detected.

A strange occurrence, and experts are still arguing what caused the discrepancy. One possible explanation is that cooling water washed radioactive material off debris, taking it somewhere else.

But here’s a truly terrifying catch: according to the report, Tepco highly doubts the new readings, because, as was discovered later, a cover was not removed from the robot-mounted measurement device at the time of the inspection, NHK World reports.

Exactly one year ago, Sputnik reported that Tepco engineers discovered absolutely insane levels of radiation of about 530 Sv/h within the reactor. Such levels of radiation would kill a human within seconds. By comparison, the Chernobyl reactor reads 34 Sv/h radiation level, enough to kill a human after 20 minutes of exposure.

Japan Begins Disposal of Radioactive Waste From Fukushima Disaster

The levels of radiation within Fukushima reactor number 2 were so high that Tepco’s toughest robot, designed to withstand 1000 Sv/h of radiation, had to be pulled out, as it started glitching due to high radiation levels. Nuclear experts called the radiation levels “unimaginable” at the time.

On November 2017, the New York Times and other news outlets reported a much smaller figure of 70 Sv/h of radiation, more or less on par with a 74 Sv/h reading gathered before an anomalous 530 Sv/h spike.

While that radiation dosimeter cover negligence prevents precise calculations, the actual picture inside Unit 2 is thought to be much worse.

Japanese state broadcaster NHK World quoted experts saying that if the cleaning of the stricken power plant is not properly addressed, it will result in major leak of radioactivity with “global” consequences.

Richard Black, director of the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit, says that while the readings are not reliable, they still “demonstrate that, seven years after the disaster, cleaning up the Fukushima site remains a massive challenge — and one that we’re going to be reading about for decades, never mind years.”

Mycle Schneider, independent energy consultant and lead author of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report, criticized Tepco, saying the power company has “no clue” what it is doing.

“I find it symptomatic of the past seven years, in that they don’t know what they’re doing, Tepco, these energy companies, haven’t a clue what they’re doing, so to me it’s been going wrong from the beginning. It’s a disaster of unseen proportions.”

In observing the poor maintenance of plant radiation leaks, Schneider also pointed out that the company stores nuclear waste at the site in an inappropriate way.

“This is an area of the planet that gets hit by tornadoes and all kinds of heavy weather patterns, which is a problem. When you have waste stored above ground in inappropriate ways, it can get washed out and you can get contamination all over the place.”

https://sputniknews.com/environment/201802041061337934-global-consequences-fukushima-leak/

Posted under Fair Use Rules.