• Diablo Canyon scoping memo comments — due Aug. 31

Excerpts from the Federal Register, July 1, 2015

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/07/01/2015-15921/diablo-canyon-power-plant-units-1-and-2

Summary

On January 27, 2010, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) notified the public of its opportunity to participate in the scoping process associated with the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) related to the review of the license renewal application submitted by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) for the renewal of Facility Operating Licenses DPR-80 and DPR-82 for an additional 20 years of operation at Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP), Units 1 and 2. The current operating licenses for DCPP, Units 1 and 2 expire on November 2, 2024, and August 26, 2025, respectively. The scoping period closed on April 12, 2010. The NRC has decided to reopen the scoping process and allow members of the public an additional opportunity to participate.

DATES:

The comment period for the environmental scoping process published on January 27, 2010 (75 FR 4427) has been reopened. Comments should be filed no later than August 31, 2015.

II. Discussion

On December 22, 2014 (ADAMS Package No. ML14364A259), and February 25, 2015 (ADAMS Package No. ML15057A102), PG&E amended its ER to provide additional information identified by NRC staff as necessary to complete the review of the DCPP license renewal application. By letter dated April 28, 2015 (ADAMS Accession No. ML15104A509), the NRC staff issued a schedule for the remainder of the DCPP license renewal review. The purpose of this notice is to (1) inform the public that the NRC has decided to reopen the scoping process, as defined in 10 CFR 51.29, “Scoping-environmental impact statement and supplement to environmental impact statement,” and (2) allow members of the public an additional opportunity to participate. The comments already received by the NRC will be considered; reopening of the scoping process provides additional opportunity for the public to comment on issues that may have emerged since completion of the last scoping period.

The NRC will first conduct a scoping process for the supplement to the GEIS and, as soon as practicable thereafter, will prepare a draft supplement to the GEIS for public comment. Participation in the scoping process by members of the public and local, State, Tribal, and Federal government agencies is encouraged. The scoping process for the supplement to the GEIS will be used to accomplish the following:

  1. Define the proposed action, which is to be the subject of the supplement to the GEIS;
  2. Determine the scope of the supplement to the GEIS and identify the significant issues to be analyzed in depth;
  3. Identify and eliminate from detailed study those issues that are peripheral or that are not significant;
  4. Identify any environmental assessments and other ElSs that are being or will be prepared that are related to, but are not part of, the scope of the supplement to the GEIS being considered;
  5. Identify other environmental review and consultation requirements related to the proposed action;
  6. Indicate the relationship between the timing of the preparation of the environmental analyses and the Commission’s tentative planning and decision-making schedule;
  7. Identify any cooperating agencies and, as appropriate, allocate assignments for preparation and schedules for completing the supplement to the GEIS to the NRC and any cooperating agencies; andShow citation box
  8. Describe how the supplement to the GEIS will be prepared and include any contractor assistance to be used.

More information and links to documents at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/07/01/2015-15921/diablo-canyon-power-plant-units-1-and-2

 

• Jimmy Carter’s cancer risk history censored by news media

Jimmy Carter touring Three Mile Island,  April 1, 1979
Jimmy Carter touring Three Mile Island,
April 1, 1979
Courtesy of Wikipedia.org. Public domain.

Former President Jimmy Carter recently had cancer on his liver removed, and is now being treated for cancer on his brain.

Jimmy Carter helped cleanup a nuclear accident in Canada during the 1950s. As President, he toured Three Mile Island on the fourth day after the partial meltdown, while the accident was still ongoing. And he was part of then-Captain Hyman G. Rickover’s fledgling nuclear submarine program when he served in the Navy. These substantial radiation exposures are risk factors for cancer, but they aren’t mentioned in the (virtually identical) media reports dated August 20. One AP article stated his cancer is probably due to too much sun.

Experts say his lifelong activities may have increased his risk for skin cancer. He lives in the South, is fair-skinned and freckled, and through Habitat for Humanity and travel, has spent a lot of time outdoors, noted Anna Pavlick, co-director of the melanoma program at NYU’s Laura & Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center.”            http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/cfn/2015/8/20/jimmy_carter_to_disc.html

Many think Jimmy Carter was just a peanut farmer who became President for one term, and then got involved with Habitat for Humanity. His career is much more extensive.

Carter graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, served on submarines as a Navy officer, did graduate work at Union College (NY) in reactor technology and nuclear physics, and was senior officer of the pre-commissioning crew of the Seawolf, the second US nuclear submarine. He helped shut down and disassemble the Ontario Chalk River Experimental Reactor after it suffered a partial meltdown in 1952. This, plus his exposure at TMI in 1979, together with his exposures in Rickover’s program and in graduate school, are risk factors for his present cancers.

Carter himself seems unwilling to bring up this issue.

Cancers often have long latency periods and can take decades to develop.

Especially now that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission wants to declare “low-level” radiation exposure as beneficial, the lack of information on Jimmy Carter’s background and exposure is suspicious. With no information, there is no bad press for the nuclear industry, no derailing an industry-friendly NRC decision, and no reminders about Fukushima.

———————————-

Remember: NRC comments due September 8.

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/06/23/2015-15441/linear-no-threshold-model-and-standards-for-protection-against-radiation

Sources:

http://www.cartercenter.org/news/experts/jimmy_carter.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Carter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Mile_Island_accident

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_civilian_nuclear_accidents#1960s

Note: A 2007 New York Times article on the Carter family also sidestepped malathion and pesticide exposure as a reason for his family’s high death rate from pancreatic cancer.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/07/health/07jimm.html?_r=1&

 

 

 

• Be afraid: Japan is about to do something that’s never been done before

From Zero Hedge, 8-8-15

By Tyler Durden

When the words “mothballed”, “nuclear”, and “never been done before” are seen together with Japan in a sentence, the world should be paying attention…

As TEPCO officials face criminal charges over the lack of preparedness with regard Fukushima, and The IAEA Report assigns considerable blame to the Japanese culture of “over-confidence & complacency,” Bloomberg reports,

Japan is about to do something that’s never been done before: Restart a fleet of mothballed nuclear reactors. 

The first reactor to meet new safety standards could come online as early as next week. Japan is reviving its nuclear industry four years after all its plants were shut for safety checks following the earthquake and tsunami that wrecked the Fukushima Dai-Ichi station north of Tokyo, causing radiation leaks that forced the evacuation of 160,000 people. 

Mothballed reactors have been turned back on in other parts of the world, though not on this scale — 25 of Japan’s 43 reactors have applied for restart permits. One lesson learned elsewhere is that the process rarely goes smoothly. Of 14 reactors that resumed operations after four years offline, all had emergency shutdowns and technical failures, according to data from the World Nuclear Association, an industry group. 

“If reactors have been offline for a long time, there can be issues with long-dormant equipment and with ‘rusty’ operators,” Allison Macfarlane, a former chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, said by e-mail.

In case you are not worried enough yet…

As problems can arise with long-dormant reactors, the NRA “should be testing all the equipment as well as the operator beforehand in preparation,” Macfarlane of the U.S. said by e-mail. Although the NRA “is a new agency, many of the staff there have long experience in nuclear issues,” she said. 

Kyushu Electric has performed regular checks since the reactor was shut to ensure it restarts and operates safely, said a company spokesman, who asked not to be identified because of company policy. 

“If a car isn’t used for a while, and you suddenly use it, then there is usually a problem. There is definitely this type of worry with Sendai,” said Ken Nakajima, a professor at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. “Kyushu Electric is probably thinking about this as well and preparing for it.”

It’s not the first time a nation has tried this..

In Sweden, E.ON Sverige AB closed the No. 1 unit at its Oskarshamn plant in 1992 and restarted it in 1996. 

It had six emergency shutdowns in the following year and a refueling that should have taken 38 days lasted more than four months after cracks were found in equipment.

*  *  *

Good luck Japan

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-08-08/be-afraid-japan-about-do-something-thats-never-been-done

• Russia declassifies report on the aftermath of the US nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; U.S. denied contamination of cities and said Japanese were exaggerating bombs’ effects [audio]

The U.S. official story on atomic radiation hasn’t changed — nothing to worry about, no hazard, no long-term effects. The current NRC proceeding to declare radiation exposure as healthful is just more of the same.
The U.S. government continues to justify its actions against Japan despite all the evidence showing it entrapped Japan into war in the first place and knew that the Japanese government was surrendering before the decision was made to drop the bombs.
Posted on Fort Russ
August 5, 2015
Kristina Rus 

Russian Historical Society has published a report of the Soviet ambassador to Japan on the aftermath of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki from the Archive of Foreign Policy of Russia in time for the 70-th anniversary of the attacks. The report was recorded a month after the attacks.

The following is an audio reading of highlights of the report, read by journalist Maurice Herman:

The following are the highlights of the report:

The train terminal and the city of Hiroshima were destroyed so much that there was no shelter to hide from the rain.
The city was a scorched plain with 15-20 cement buildings left standing.
Several dozen thousand people huddled in the dugouts on the outskirts of the city.
People who came to help the victims during the first 5-10 days died.
A month after the bombing grass began to grow and new leaves appeared on the burned trees.
Glass windows in the cement building of police department, which was left standing, blew out inward. The ceiling was bulging upwards.
The zone of impact was 6-8 kilometers, where all the buildings were damaged.
At 5-6 kilometers mostly roofs were damaged.

Some areas were not affected by the rays, suggesting that the energy was expelled unequally by bursts. Some people who where close to the injured did not receive any burns. This pertains to sections significantly removed from the impact.

Everything alive was destroyed in the radius of one kilometer.

The sound and the flash were heard and seen 50 kilometers away.

On person reported seeing a flash and feeling a touch of a warm stream on his cheek and a needle pinch.

Many people only had injuries from shattered glass.

Burns were mainly on the face, arms and legs.

A doctor reported seeing three bombs dropped on parachutes, two of which did not explode and were collected by the military. The doctor experienced diarrhea after drinking the water. Other rescuers got sick after 36 hours. The doctor said that in those affected the white blood cell count reduced from 8000 per cubic centimeter to 3,000, 1,000 and even 300, which causes bleeding from nose, throat, eyes, and from the uterus in females. The injured die after 3-4 days.

The injured, who are evacuated heal faster. Those who drank or rinsed with water in the impact area died thereafter.

After a month it was considered safe to stay in the impact zone, however it was still not conclusive.

According to the doctor, rubber clothing offered protection against uranium, as well as any material which is a conductor of electricity.

A girl who visited the area a few days after the blast got sick in 1-2 weeks and died 3 days after.

Nagasaki is divided into two sections by a mountain. The section sheltered from the blast by a mountain had much less destruction.

Japanese driver in Nagasaki said no rescue work was done on the day of the bombing, because the city was engulfed in fire.

Nagasaki bomb was dropped over a university hospital in Urakami district (near a Mitsubishi plant), all the patients and the staff of the hospital died.

The driver said, some children who were up on the trees [playing?] survived, but those on the ground died.

Most people in Hiroshima said the bomb was dropped on a parachute and detonated 500-600 feet above the ground.

The head of the sanitary service of the 5th American fleet, commander Willkatts said that no parachutes were used in the dropping of the bombs. He also said no bomb could fall without detonating.

He said after the bombing the zone of impact is safe and the Japanese are exaggerating the effects of a nuclear bomb.

(The pictures above are from the online sources, and not from the report)