— Upcoming Dept. of Energy hearings on national nuclear waste dumps will be held in California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Arizona, Idaho, Minnesota

DOE wants to dump their nuclear waste in your state. They are looking for “stakeholders” who will “consent.”

These are the remaining meetings, starting with Tuesday, April 26, in Sacramento, California.

  • Sacramento, California on April 26, 2016 at the Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza – Sacramento
  • Denver, Colorado on May 24, 2016 at the Embassy Suites Denver – Stapleton.
  • Boston, Massachusetts on June 2, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Boston.
  • Tempe, AZ n June 23, 2016 at the Marriott Phoenix Tempe at the Buttes.
  • Boise, ID on July 14, 2016 at Boise Centre.
  • Minneapolis, MN on July 21, 2016 at the Hilton Minneapolis.

DOE is controlling the commenting, only allowing a 45-minute Q&A following the panel, and a 30 minute public comment period after a break. Even the California Public Utilities Commission allows a longer comment period during its local public hearings for matters of relatively minor import. This is a matter of great public and national importance. DOE plans to break up the audience and spend 1 hour, 45 minutes in small groups. This is a divide and conquer approach, where opposition can be fragmented. Demand that all industry leaders make comments in open meeting, and that all comments and questions from the audience be made in the open meeting to be heard by everyone. No small groups.

The meetings are listed here, together with links to register and to view the meetings online. They are requesting registration, but it is unknown whether this is a requirement.

Please copy and paste these links into your browser rather than going directly from the links.

http://www.energy.gov/ne/consent-based-siting

California April 26 meeting information: http://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2016/04/f30/Pages%20from%20CBS%20Public%20Meeting-Sacramento-%20Updated%20Agenda.pdf — agenda

 
http://www.energy.gov/ne/downloads/meeting-materials-consent-based-siting-public-meeting-sacramento-april-26-2016

MEETING MATERIALS: CONSENT-BASED SITING PUBLIC MEETING IN SACRAMENTO (APRIL 26, 2016)

Meeting Materials: Consent-Based Siting Public Meeting in Sacramento (April 26, 2016)

The Department will host a public meeting on consent-based siting on April 26th in Sacramento at the Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza. The purpose of the consent-based siting public meeting is to hear from the public and interested stakeholders on what matters to you as the Department of Energy moves forward in developing a consent-based process for siting the facilities needed to manage spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The agenda includes a presentation from the Department of Energy’s Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, John Kotek. Mr. Kotek will discuss the nuclear energy activities that have brought us to this point, as well as describe the Department’s vision for an integrated waste management system and the need for a consent-based approach to siting. This presentation will be followed by a panel session with several experts providing diverse perspectives on the primary issues that need to be resolved in the design and implementation of a consent-based process. Participants will then have the opportunity to comment or ask questions to the Department and the panelists.

Following this session, there will be facilitated small group discussions on a variety of topics related to consent-based siting and integrated waste management. These small group discussions will provide the opportunity for participants to engage more closely on topics of interest to them. The Department intends for these small group discussions to be frank and open sessions on key topics that will inform the design of a consent-based process. The consent-based process will in turn serve as a framework for working with potential host communities in the future.

The agenda also includes a public comment period and two open houses with poster sessions before and after the formal meeting. The open house sessions provide participants with an opportunity to engage in less formal discussions with the Department and other meeting attendees.

The consent-based siting public meeting will also be webcast. We look forward to your participation!

Federal Register notice:

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/12/23/2015-32346/invitation-for-public-comment-to-inform-the-design-of-a-consent-based-siting-process-for-nuclear

The 1001 dump sites of Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State

This article was cited in the previous video.

From Dr. William Mount
January 2014

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is located in South Central Washington along the Columbia River in one of the most agriculturally productive areas in the world.

The Reservation began during WW2 to help build the first Atom Bomb. Since then this reservation has served as a primary storage area for Nuclear waste for this nation. Rather than doing what the Russians do-storing Nuclear Waste in 39,000 foot deep trenches in the Artic where it does no harm we just haul it to Hanford.

So what exactly does Hanford do with the Solid and liquid Nuclear Waste once they get it?

Here is what we have learned so far:

1) Up until 1974 Hanford dumped their Liquid Waste into open trenches where it seeped into the Columbia a River. At the BLUE BRIDGE these folks have been testing the water in the Columbia River just below Hanford for 70 years every day.

2) The Open Trenches were covered with metal covers in 1974 due to public protests but they dumping continues.

3) Solid Waste was stored in metal 55 gallon drums. I spoke with a Back Hoe driver about 5 years ago and he tried to pull one of those barrels up and it disintegrated in his shovel so – there they remain.

4) Solid Waste was also stored in Cement Barrels without rebar – and they also came apart when the back hoe hit the barrels – so they just threw dirt over the barrels and called it a day.

5) If you look at the aerial photos of Hanford you will see two open pits where Raw Nuclear Waste is dumped near the bend in the river.

6) Much of the waste blows down into the Kennewick Area – this is why it currently has the highest rates of Cancer, MS and other neurological disorders in the world.

7) The Spokane Indian reservation is just North and East of the Hanford Nuclear reservation. After speaking with a couple of Reservation Employees dealing with the reservation they told me that trucks come into the reservation form Hanford and go up creeks to old mine shafts and dump their waste daily. They tested over 1,000 wells and all of them showed contamination form raw Uranium. So apparently this “Raw Uranium” is being dumped directly into the ground water by those at Hanford – and has been for over 60 years.

Over and over again I heard stories about these trucks going up roads loaded and coming back empty — roads up creeks, roads to old mine shafts, roads where the only way to dump a load is by dumping it in the creek.

8) I was told by a truck driver a few weeks ago that had just retired that he would haul Nuclear Waste up a 4 1/2 mile road and dump it into a pond on top of a hill over looking the Columbia. This Waste Pond is the Rabanco Owned mine just West of the town of Wellpinit Washington. In fact – there are two open pit Nuclear Dump Sites there as can bee seen on Google Earth.

One of the mines is the Midnight Mine.

By the Way Rabanco has been renamed Allied Waste and then renamed New Republic Services.

The EPA also did a fly over and said: Don’t worry, be happy. It’s all fixed — as more trucks drove up to the mine to dump their radioactive waste.

These Indians are being slaughtered by the Hanford Folks as the NRC directors toast their success in ridding themselves of this toxic waste.

9) I realize that those who run Hanford assume that that these folks are only Indians and the only good Indian is a dead Indian – right?

They are Americans and I have been winning cases for their veterans for over 15 years now at no cost to them. In fact – I just won another one yesterday.

10) I met a gal at my mortgage company who’s husband would guard trains going form Hanford to Idaho and then dump their load into Tankers and then the tanker trucks would go down abandoned roads and dump their radioactive loads, Now the trees are so radioactive in these Unmarked Dump Sites that the trees are dying.

If you live in Northern Idaho – test your water for radioactive contamination.

Here is why killing Spokane Indians is legal.

(((By the way – they are Indians (Not Native Americans) and proud of it)))

1) The Nuclear Energy Commission is a Private Corporation owned by the IMF.

2) The Spokane Indian Reservation is a Private Corporation owned by the US Dept of Agriculture, which is also a private corporation owned by the IMF.

3) If you write an Environmental Impact Statement and have an Inter Agency (Corporation) agreement you may murder people legally – – white man’s laws.

GOD calls it murder.

Here is the good news:

APFN THE CURE FOR CANCER UPDATE 3

APFN THE HANFORD ANT, HAIRY LEUKEMIA, AND IMMUSIST.

Since the Spokane Indian Reservation Hospital refused to respond to me will somebody please shove this story into the faces of the Spokane Indian Reservation Board of Directors and demand the Cure for Cancer be made available on the reservation!

By the way – there is a Canadian Toxic Waste Disposal Site just north of the boarder along the Columbia River where Canadian trucks openly dump raw waste just East of Grand Forks BC. Here all sorts of toxic Waste is dumped into a river leading directly into the US in violation of a dozen treaties.

Hey – here is an ideas – rather than bombing Libya or Syria or Iran… – how about stopping the toxic waste form being dumped into the Columbia River Mr. Obama?

Dr William B. Mount
253-686-6290

http://drwilliammount.blogspot.com/2014/01/the-1001-dump-sites-of-hanford-nuclear.html

Nuclear Nightmare: “Safe Side of the Fence” screens in Idaho

From the Boise Weekly

April 25, 7 p.m., presented by Snake River Alliance

The Safe Side of the Fence screens Monday, April 25, 7 p.m., at The Flicks

Courtesy of the film “Safe Side of the Fence”

The Safe Side of the Fence screens Monday, April 25, 7 p.m., at The Flicks

Since 2000, more than 3,500 workers at Idaho nuclear facilities have been paid over $250 million in compensation through the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program. Nationwide, those numbers are much higher, but may be a fraction of the nuclear program’s true costs to America’s “Cold War vets.” In many cases, illnesses or injuries were suffered on account of poor workplace safety and failure to properly inform workers of the risks of handling radioactive materials.

“I don’t think we can be overly complacent because we’re still having exposures,” said Snake River Alliance Nuclear Program Director Beatrice Brailsford. “We are much more able to provide protection than we used to, but … any mistake can have serious consequences.”

As recently as April 17, reports of a sizeable leak in a nuclear waste storage tank at the Hanford Site on the Columbia River caused emergency crews to respond to what some described as a “catastrophic” incident.

When the United States nuclear program was in its infancy in the 1940s and ’50s, problems of workplace safety and treatment of laborers were more acute. This is evident at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works in St. Louis, Mo.­–one of the first uranium refineries in the world and the subject of The Safe Side of the Fence.

“Those workers were some of the most contaminated workers in history,” said director Tony West, who will travel to Boise as a guest of the Snake River Alliance for the film’s screening at The Flicks.

The Mallinckrodt workers refined uranium used at the University of Chicago Pile-1 and the Manhattan Project. Later, the West Lake Landfill, where waste was illegally deposited, became a Superfund site. Its workers suffer disproportionately from contamination-related illnesses.

The compensation program itself is 16 years old, but only a few of the people who worked at the plant have received money through it. West made the plant’s lasting impact on St. Louis and learning why compensation has been elusive for its workers the thrust of his documentary.

“The story’s about these workers, but it’s also about waste,” he said.

http://www.boiseweekly.com/boise/nuclear-nightmare-safe-side-of-the-fence-screens-at-the-flicks/Content?oid=3770766

[Editor: This is where the jobs were during the Depression. In addition, there was lots of flag-waving. It was considered unpatriotic to question. People believe what they want to believe, especially if it pays the bills and puts food on the table.]

— Hanford nuclear worker brought to tears over leaking waste — “I was ready to sell everything and move to the woods” (VIDEO)

From 2013
Posted on ENE News

Title: Hanford worker’s struggle to ‘do the right thing’ link has been removed
Source: KING 5
Author: SUSANNAH FRAME
Date: April 25, 2013

The private company that manages the radioactive waste tank farms at the Hanford Site ignored or missed numerous red flags over a 10-month period that showed a double-shell tank holding some of the worst waste was leaking.

Over much of that time, one Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) employee — Mike Geffre — continued to urge his superiors to take some sort of action. […]

“It bugged me to the point I was ready to sell everything and move to the woods, go to the mountains where I didn’t have to hear about it, read about it. I didn’t want to hear about Hanford. I didn’t want to deal with it anymore,” said Geffre.

Through tears, Geffre struggled to express how distraught he’d become. […]

“I kept the faith that they would do the right thing. I believed in my company that they would do what was right. That’s why the stress came into play. I kept trusting them, and when nothing happened I really struggled,” said Geffre. […]

Watch the broadcast here — link has been removed

http://enenews.com/u-s-nuclear-worker-brought-to-tears-over-leaking-waste-i-was-ready-to-sell-everything-and-move-to-the-woods-video

Scientific organization requests assistance for initiatives, including nuclear waste decontamination

A short history of this excellent organization is below.

From The Planetary Association for Clean Energy Inc./ La Société planétaire pour l’assainissement de l’énergie, inc – PACE

Urgent PACE request for timely support:

We are involved in a number of initiatives internationally that are for the improvement of planetary affairs on a number of fronts and which do require support other than just volunteerism and sheer willpower..

Developments:

  • on-going negotiations in several nations for the clean-up of nuclear wastes, contaminated zones involving several techniques, as well as advanced logistics / assessment modalities. These negotiations are very demanding on our limited resources in preparing responses.
  • documentation preparations including on-site evidence gathering for a class action suit concerning existing and emerging electromagnetic field emissions when they are injurious to society and to at least 30% of population in developed areas. This case could have worldwide repercussions.

We are also involved, since more than a year, in advanced stages, prototyping stand-alone electrical energy supply for sustainable communities.

IF YOU WISH TO HAVE DETAILS ABOUT THESE HUMANITARIAN AND SCIENTIFIC DEVELOPMENTS, PLEASE ADVISE.

Therefore we are hereby requesting your support for such initiatives, which can be made out:

by PayPal, http://zapnuclearwaste.com/zap-nuclear-waste/donate-to-pace/.

by VISA/MasterCard (888) 639-7730 (toll-free in North America)

or by cheques / money order to:

PACE, Inc.
100 Bronson Avenue, Suite 1001
Ottawa K1R 6G8
Canada

We thank you for your interest and continued support!

Andrew Michrowski
President
paceincnet (at) gmail.com

http://pacenet.homestead.com

About PACE:

The Planetary Association for Clean Energy, Incorporated was founded in June 1975 in Ottawa, Canada, under the guidance of the Hon. Senator Chesley W. Carter, then Chair-person of the Senate’s Standing Committee on Health, Welfare and Science as well as member of the Senate Special Committee on Science Policy. With the Hon. Carter, a number of scientists undertook to make use of this Association to develop an international interdisciplinary network of advanced scientific thinking individuals and organizations. Together, these were to promote and steward “clean energy systems” for eventual implementation on a planetary-wide scale. 

Clean energy systems are defined as those which draw on natural supply, which are universal in application, which are inexpensive and which do not cause polluting residue.  

Already by 1976 such systems were being examined and promoted by the founders of the Association. This initial nucleus of scientists grew. In 1979, the Association became incorporated as a Canadian non-profit corporation. Its Federal Charter foresaw the role of facilitation of the discovery, research, development, demonstration and evaluation of clean energy systems. Another role cited is stewarding the planning, co-ordination and implementation of clean energy systems on planetary, continental, regional, local and individual scales. Experience has enjoined the network to act responsibly by serving as a monitor and an alert system for emerging “unclean” systems not considered by other groups.  

In 1980, the Association became a Learned Society and hosted its first sessions as such at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Its network currently comprises about 3,500 individuals and institutions in over 60 nations. Its official publication is the Newsletter. Since 1981, books, proceedings, monographs and electronic publications have been released to both general and specialist audiences.  

In 1986, the Learned Society initiated sustained efforts towards international technological transfer through a Symposium/exhibition in Hull (Gatineau), Québec, followed by a 1989 presentation at the United Nations, where it is recognized as an Associate NGO, since 2004 in special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), since 2006 with the United Nations Human Rights Council 

In 1990, the University of Ottawa‘s Institute for Research on Environment and Economy has conferred an associative status to the Society.

Update: Upcoming U.S. hearings: what would it take for YOU to CONSENT to Nuclear Waste? DOE wants to “know”

DOE should be met with torches and pitchforks, and run out of town.

UPDATE: DOE is requesting/requiring registration. Each of these meetings can be viewed on the web as they happen.

From the Department of Energy
http://www.energy.gov/ne/consent-based-siting

UPCOMING EVENTS

Our next public meeting will be held in Sacramento, California on April 26th at the Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza.

The remaining five public meetings will be in:

  • Denver, Colorado on May 24, 2016 at the Embassy Suites Denver – Stapleton.
  • Boston, Massachusetts on June 2, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Boston.
  • Tempe, AZ n June 23, 2016 at the Marriott Phoenix Tempe at the Buttes.
  • Boise, ID on July 14, 2016 at Boise Centre.
  • Minneapolis, MN on July 21, 2016 at the Hilton Minneapolis.

We look forward to your participation!

Posted on Beyond Nuclear

March 17, 2016

Our friends and colleagues at NIRS put out the following action alert on March 10, 2016:

The US Dept. of Energy (DOE) is holding 8 Public Meetings and taking written comments on

“CONSENTING” to TAKE NUCLEAR WASTE

After decades of trying to force-feed the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear dump down the throats of Nevadans and the Western Shoshone Nation, the DOE and nuclear proponents want to know what it will take to get people to consent or appear to consent to take nuclear waste.

DOE openly acknowledges this is “consent” to future nuclear waste production as part of the “integrated waste management system.” They say that the future of nuclear energy in this country depends on this.

Meetings will be held from noon or 1 PM to ~ 5PM

CHICAGO, IL           March 29, 2016           University of Chicago Conference Center

ATLANTA, GA          April 11, 2016             Georgia Institute of Technology Conference Center

[The following DATES were not included in NIRS’ action alert on March 10th; later that very same day, however, a DOE spokesman at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Regulatory Information Conference, during the “Spent Fuel – Perspectives on Interim Consolidated Storage” workshop session, confirmed the following dates, but still not the exact locations, other than the city and state.]

SACRAMENTO, CA   Late April, 2016           Exact location yet to be announced

DENVER, CO           Late May, 2016           Exact location yet to be announced

BOSTON, MA           Early June, 2016         Exact location yet to be announced

TEMPE, AZ              Late June, 2016          Exact location yet to be announced

BOISE, ID               Mid-July, 2016            Exact location yet to be announced

MINNEAPOLIS, MN       Late July, 2016       Exact location yet to be announced

DOE seeks our input on how to be FAIR, WHO to include, what RESOURCES it will take to induce participation.

They want to identify who adequately represents a community and will “consent” or claim to agree to take nuclear waste.

[Editor: This was done with Native American tribes. The U.S. government would find someone in the tribe willing to do what they wanted, and they would be appointed an “official” representative capable of making decisions for the whole tribe. Then the tribe would be sold out by the decisions made. This would also cause massive discord and enmity within the tribes, pitting member against member. Generally, these arrangements would concern natural resources and land.

Indigenous people typically regard land as held in common; dividing up land and portioning off land to individual families goes against their ways. By offering money to often desperately poor members, the U.S. government, and/or private companies could destroy the unity of the tribe and create so much internal tribal discord that opposition would be greatly diminished, and confiscate land and/or resources.]

They are not defining exactly what or how much nuclear waste we would be “consenting” or not consenting to accept.

They are not asking how a community can refuse or express permanent “non-consent,” although you can let them know that if you choose to.

Although they have reports, diagrams of storage containers and systems, ideas and plans for the tens of thousands of tons of nuclear waste in this country, they claim to want to negotiate with communities who would “consent” to take it forever or supposedly temporarily.

NO CONSIDERATION OF THE RIGHTS OR CONSENT OF THOSE ALONG TRANSPORT ROUTES IS BEING MADE OR REQUESTED. Although one of the greatest dangers to the most people, environments and ecosystems is the movement of tens of thousands of tons of nuclear waste on roads, rails and waterways, DOE stated at its Washington DC ‘kickoff’ meeting that there is complete federal preemption over transport of nuclear waste so that would not be part of the process.

There is NO Consideration of the rights of future generations who will inevitably be affected.

The nuclear industry is eager for volunteers or consenting communities to take the waste and for the US Department of Energy to take title to it.

Meetings will be in 8 US CITIES from MARCH TO JULY 2016.

Comment deadline is June 15, 2016; email to consentbasedsiting@hq.doe.gov.  Please include “Response to IPC” [which stands for “Invitation for Public Comment”] in the subject line.

DETAILS:

Federal Register Notice:

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/12/23/2015-32346/invitation-for-public-comment-to-inform-the-design-of-a-consent-based-siting-process-for-nuclear

DOE website for more of their information and to REGISTER for MEETINGS: http://www.energy.gov/ne/consent-based-siting

Info coming soon at www.nirs.org at Stop Fukushima Freeways

More info: dianed@nirs.org; after March 21  maryo@nirs.org; For Chicago meeting neis@neis.org

(See Beyond Nuclear’s web post from January 2016, immediately following DOE’s Washington, D.C. “Kick-Off” meeting for its “Consent-Based Siting” public comment proceeding (which, by the way, included NO oral public comment opportunity! Supposedly, future public meetings listed above WILL include an oral public comment opportunity — that is the whole point! But we will see. Another disconnect that still has to be resolved is, public comment meetings are scheduled for AFTER the deadline for public comment — so DOE must extend the public comment deadline until at least all scheduled meetings are finished and done!)

http://www.beyondnuclear.org/radioactive-waste-whatsnew/2016/3/17/nirs-what-would-it-take-for-you-to-consent-to-nuclear-waste.html

20,000 drums of radioactive waste waiting in Idaho for disposal

From the Post Register

February 25, 2016

Containers filled with radioactive waste continue to stack up in the desert west of Idaho Falls.

There are nearly 20,000 steel drums filled with the transuranic waste, waiting to find a permanent resting place. The waste is in a holding pattern as a New Mexico nuclear waste repository slowly recovers from a pair of 2014 accidents.

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, N.M. is scheduled to reopen to limited operations in December, U.S. Department of Energy officials told the Idaho National Laboratory Site Citizens Advisory Board last week.

But DOE officials said there is still much uncertainty about when Idaho will be cleared to begin shipping out its growing stockpile of waste. That’s because even when the repository known as WIPP reopens, it’s still not expected to be back at full strength for several more years as additional repairs are made. In addition, other federal facilities around the country will be hoping to send their growing waste collections all at once, too, creating a bottleneck.

“I think it’s fair to say that once does WIPP does resume operations, it will be at a much slower pace than what we were accustomed to before the shutdown,” said Brad Bugger, a supervisor at DOE’s Idaho Operations Office.

That continued uncertainty about when the waste will leave Idaho has led to new concerns that the DOE will miss another state-mandated cleanup milestone in the 1995 Settlement Agreement. The agreement said the transuranic waste — which continues to be slowly uncovered and repackaged at the desert site — needs to be gone from the state by the end of 2018.

“It’s going to be a challenge,” to meet the deadline, said Susan Burke, INL coordinator for the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. She added that continuing to process and package the waste into drums — even if it can’t yet be shipped outside Idaho — is still safer for the environment and human health than leaving it in place.

The waste includes tools, rags, clothing, sludge and dirt — anything contaminated with a transuranic element such as plutonium. Most of it came from the now-closed Rocky Flats Plant outside Denver, where nuclear weapon components were made.

Truckloads of waste, held in wooden and fiberglass boxes and metal drums, were shipped to the site in the 1970s and ’80s, where it was dumped and covered over with dirt. For years DOE cleanup contractors have been working to carefully clean up the mess that was left behind.

In a recent interview, Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden said he is keeping an eye on the approaching 2018 deadline. DOE is already out of compliance with the Settlement Agreement due to liquid waste that was supposed to be treated by 2012. The department also is in violation of a Settlement Agreement requirement to ship a running average of 2,000 cubic meters of transuranic waste out of the state each year.

“I certainly believe we have time right now if the Department of Energy is willing — and we’re trying to engage them in conversation about that 2018 deadline — that we can find a way to resolve some of that,” Wasden said. “One of those (ways to resolve the problem) would be to have a prioritization of shipments to WIPP once it is open.”

Continue reading

Georgia: Savannah River site may get Germany’s nuclear waste; comments due March 11

More information on this proposal is available at http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=DOE_FRDOC_0001-3020

Comment deadline: March 11, 2016

It appears from the Federal Notice that there will be no scoping process public comment period if DOE decides to do an Environmental Impact Statement — see last paragraph highlighted below. That needs to be clarified and contested if so. To be on the safe side, issues that should be covered in the scope of the EIS should be raised in comments filed now.

Direct written comments on the Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA to

Tracy Williams
NEPA Compliance Officer
U.S. Department of Energy
P.O. Box B
Aiken, South Carolina 29802

Email comments on the Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA  to
GermanSpentNuclearFuelEA@leidos.com

Summary

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces the availability of its draft environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1977) evaluating the potential environmental impacts from a proposed action to receive, store, process and disposition spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Federal Republic of Germany at DOE’s Savannah River Site (SRS) (Draft German Spent Nuclear Fuel EA). (1) This SNF is composed of kernels containing thorium and U.S.-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) embedded in small graphite spheres that were irradiated in research reactors used for experimental and/or demonstration purposes. DOE invites public comments on the Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA and is announcing a public meeting.

Dates

The 45-day public comment period extends from the date of publication of this notice in the Federal Register through March 11, 2016. DOE will consider all comments received via email by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Standard Time or postmarked by that date. Comments submitted after that date and time will be considered to the extent practicable.

Addresses

This Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA is available at the following sites:

http://energy.gov/nepa/office-nepa-policy-and-compliance

http://www.srs.gov/sro/germanheuproj.html

http://www.srs.gov/general/pubs/envbul/nepa1.htm

To request a print copy of the Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA please submit your request to Tracy Williams, NEPA Compliance Officer, U.S. Department of Energy, P.O. Box B, Aiken, South Carolina 29802; or by telephone at (803) 952-8278.

DOE invites Federal agencies, state and local governments, Native American tribes, industry, other organizations, and members of the general public to submit comments on DOE’s Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA. Please direct written comments on the Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA to Tracy Williams, NEPA Compliance Officer, U.S. Department of Energy, P.O. Box B, Aiken, South Carolina 29802.

Comments on the Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA may also be submitted by email toGermanSpentNuclearFuelEA@leidos.com. DOE will give equal weight to written comments and oral comments received at the public meeting. Requests to be placed on the German Spent Nuclear Fuel EA mailing list should be directed to Tracy Williams at the postal or email addresses above.

For Further Information Contact

To request further information on SRS spent nuclear fuel disposition activities or background information on the proposed project, please contact Tracy Williams at the address as listed above.

For general information concerning DOE’s NEPA process, contact: Ms. Carol Borgstrom, Director, Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (GG-54), U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585: (202) 586-4600, or leave a message toll-free, at (800) 472-2756; fax (202) 586-7031; or send an email to AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov.

This Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA is available on the DOE NEPA Web site athttp://nepa.energy.gov, and also at the SRS Web site at http://www.srs.gov/general/pubs/envbul/nepa1.htm.

NEPA Process

All comments on the Draft Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA received during the public comment period will be considered and addressed in the Final Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA. DOE will address comments submitted after the close of the public comment period on the Draft EA to the extent practicable. Following the public comment period, and based on the EA and consideration of all comments received, DOE will either issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) or announce its intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS). If DOE determines that a FONSI is appropriate, both the Final EA and FONSI will be made available to the public.

If DOE determines that an EIS is needed, either during preparation of the Final Spent Nuclear Fuel from Germany EA or after completing the EA, DOE would issue in the Federal Register a Notice to prepare an EIS. In that case, the June 2014 public comment process would serve as the scoping process that normally would follow a Notice of Intent to prepare an EIS.

Issued in Washington, DC on January 15, 2016.
Edgardo DeLeon,
Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Disposition.
[FR Doc. 2016-01371 Filed 1-22-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6450-01-P

– California Coastal Commission approves nuclear waste storage on the beach

This photo from San Onofre Safety shows where Southern California Edison wants to store nuclear waste. It’s circled in yellow.

Location of Holtec system. SCE

The company making the canisters has already been in trouble.

By the end of 2011 Holtec International had to close its office in Kiev as it had come under harsh criticism worldwide. It is widely believed that the company has lost licenses in some countries because of the poor quality of its containers resulting in radiation leaksWestinghouse and Holtec are members of the U.S.-Ukraine Business Council (USUBC).
http://www.fort-russ.com/2016/04/us-ukraine-partnership-threatens-new.html

What could go wrong????? This is only located adjacent to millions of Californians and on the ocean.

From San Onofre Safety

Southern California Edison plans to make another bad decision by unsafely storing over 1600 metric tons of highly radioactive nuclear waste.

Below is the proposed location for the Holtec HI-STORM UMAX thin “underground” spent fuel canister system at San Onofre. Half under ground, and close to the water table and about 100 feet from the ocean. Edison admits the Sea Wall hasn’t been maintained so can’t be counted on for protection. This plan doesn’t meet Coastal Act requirements, but Coastal Commission staff think there are no other options, but there are.

Holtec Side View

 Request Coastal Commission REVOKE Nuclear Storage Permit (handout)

Excerpt:

Request Coastal Commission REVOKE Nuclear Storage Permit

The California Coastal Commission granted a Coastal permit for the San Onofre Holtec nuclear waste storage facility with “Special Conditions” that are unlikely or impossible to meet.

Special Conditions require a storage system that can be inspected, repaired, maintained, monitored, and transported without cracks but only after 20 years. The Coastal Commission recognizes the Holtec system does not currently meet these requirements, but have been convinced by Edison and others there are no other reasonable options and someday these problems will all be solved. However, there is insufficient evidence to support that and evidence to the contrary.

Reasons to revoke SoCal Edison Coastal Development Permit #9-15-0228

Coastal requirements for nuclear waste storage should be met now, not deferred 20 years.

The Coastal Commission may not have the jurisdiction to choose casks, but can require their special conditions be met now. Thin (1/2” to 5/8” thick) stainless steel canisters can crack, cannot be inspected,

repaired, maintained or adequately monitored. Cracked canisters cannot be transported. The Coastal Commission should require a system that does not have these flaws and not accept promises of future solutions.

Edison can meet Coastal requirements with thick casks. For example, Areva sells thick (over 10” thick) metal casks to the U.S. market, and to most of the rest of the world for storage and transport.

The Areva TN‐32 and TN‐40 are licensed by the NRC. The TN‐24 used at Fukushima survived the massive earthquake and tsunami. Spent fuel must cool in the pools for a few years, so choosing proven thick storage casks will not significantly delay removing fuel from pools.

Canisters cannot be repaired. Holtec President says these canisters cannot be repaired.

Partially cracked canisters cannot be transported. NRC Regulation 10 CFR § 71.85.

Canisters may crack. The NRC states it takes about 16 years for a crack to go through the wall of thin stainless steel canisters and canisters are vulnerable to cracking from marine environments.

A similar component at the Koeberg nuclear plant failed in 17 years with numerous cracks. A Diablo Canyon canister has all the conditions for cracking in a 2‐year old canister.

No funds are available to relocate this system. Once the system is installed, there are no funds to rebuild and move it to a different site, so it is not reasonable to expect it will be relocated (even onsite).

Edison’s $1.3 billion Spent Fuel Management Plan to the California Public Utilities Commission assumes nothing will go wrong and they will not need to pay to move the fuel on‐site or elsewhere.

Edison’ plan assumes the Dept. of Energy will start picking up the fuel in 2024, which Edison admitted to the CPUC is unlikely.

Vaporware is not a solution. The Coastal Commission should not base decisions on “vaporware” – promises of solutions that do not exist with no guarantee they will exist in the future. Even State of California procurement rules do not allow procurement of “vaporware”.

Edison plans to destroy the spent fuel pools. Pools are the only method to replace canisters.

The Commission should add a special condition to not destroy pools unless a better plan is in place.

Existing 51 thin canisters may have cracks. Fuel loading into thin canisters began in 2003, so “special

conditions” for aging management and related issues should be addressed now.

Act now: Email Joseph.Street@coastal.ca.gov More info & references at SanOnofreSafety.org

Click to access revokecoastalpermit2015-11-5.pdf

• Letter to Vermont: “We also have a nuclear waste dump at San Onofre”

Regarding the problems with decommissioning the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant and with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(http://www.commonsnews.org/site/site05/story.php?articleno=12446&page=1)
a reader from California wrote this letter:

The good folks in Vermont should be studying what we have been going through for several years after the decommissioning of San Onofre. Check out SanOnofreSafety.org.

We did a poll, and 92 percent favored naming it the Darrell Issa Nuclear Waste Dump.

We are supposed to be one of the six nuclear power plants in the country that the National Academy of Sciences wants to study for cancer streaks.

But the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has held up the funding for the study.

Apparently, they are afraid of what it might reveal for residents who live within 31 miles.

What are you doing now that you have also become a nuclear waste dump?

Roger Johnson, San Clemente, Calif.

http://www.commonsnews.org/site/site05/story.php?articleno=12456&page=1#.VafAikJB-S1